Skip to main content Skip to navigation
Washington State University Factsheets

Master of Science in Chemistry

Faculty working with Students: 42
Students: 6
Students receiving assistantships or scholarships: 83.33%
Priority deadline:
  • Fall Not accepting apps
  • Spring Not accepting apps
Campus:
  • Pullman: Yes
  • Tri-Cities: Yes
Tests required:
  • GRE

Degree Description:

While the WSU Chemistry graduate program emphasizes the Ph.D. degree, we appreciate that there are circumstances that favor awarding of the M.S. degree. The degree of Master of Science is awarded in recognition of scholarship and contributions to knowledge in the field of Chemistry. The Master’s Degree is based on research carried out in the laboratories of the Department and allows students to gain experience in modern experimental techniques and to familiarize themselves with the daily workings of a laboratory. Master’s Degree students (on either the thesis or non-thesis track) must carry out a research project under the supervision of a member of the Chemistry Department faculty. Master’s students are expected to participate fully in the scientific life of the Department and to attend the various meetings and seminars that take place.

Student Learning Outcome:

All graduates will be able to:

  1. To enable students to prepare for professional careers in chemistry, the program aims to provide a variety of experiences that will help students to:
    • Achieve expertise in fundamental areas of analytical, organic, inorganic, and physical chemistry.
    • Apply theory and methodologies within these areas to conduct independent research that addresses scientific and technological problems of broad chemical interest.
    • Effectively communicate the results of their research in peer reviewed journal articles and in oral presentations to chemistry faculty and students in the department and at local, regional, and national conferences.
    • Become effective members of the scientific community by participating and taking leadership roles in teaching, professional organizations, and service on local, regional and national levels.
  2. To help students to become effective teachers and researchers and contribute to scientific advancements, the program aims to help students to:
    •  Become independent, motivated researchers in a specific area of study with the ability to recognize and address important scientific problems and to make original contributions to the solution of these problems.
    •  Present an original proposal summarizing the existing literature in their area of study, posing an extant question or hypothesis, and presenting their plans for investigating and advancing the state of knowledge in this area.
    •  Conduct independent research using sound methods of data collection and analysis.
    •  Effectively present the results of their research in written and oral presentations.
  3. To enhance the prestige of the chemistry graduate program, we aim to:
    •  Attract and retain high quality graduate students and increase the number of graduate students in our program.
    •  Mentor graduate students to enable them to complete their degrees in a timely manner
    •  Prepare students to successfully compete for academic, industrial, and government lab positions on graduation
    •  Recruit and retain nationally and internationally recognized faculty and assist them to compete for extramural funding to support graduate student research assistantships.
  4. To provide well trained and responsive TAs, we:
    • Have them complete a course in teaching chemistry laboratory and tutorials.
    • Perfect these skills through performing undergraduate teaching, grading, and mentoring activities.

Faculty Members:

Berkman, Clifford, Ph.D.

Serves as: chair, co-chair, or member on graduate committee

Research Interests

Design, synthesis, and evaluation of inhibitors of proteases and peptidases related to cancer; design of novel enzymes inhibitors for the use in targeting tumor cells with diagnostic and therapeutic agents.

Black, Margaret, Ph.D.

Serves as: chair, co-chair, or member on graduate committee

Research Interests

Molecular evolution, pathway engineering and extensive in vitro and in vivo analyses to improve and evaluate suicide genes for gene therapy of cancer.

Brozik, James, Ph.D.

Serves as: chair, co-chair, or member on graduate committee

Research Interests

Biophysics, Material Science, Biosensors, Instrument Design and Fabrication.

Bryan, Samuel, Ph.D.

Serves as: chair, co-chair, or member on graduate committee

Clark, Aurora, Ph.D.

Serves as: chair, co-chair, or member on graduate committee

Research Interests

Multiscale Computational Chemistry of Heavy Elements; graph-theoretical methods applied to intermolecular networks.

Clark, Sue, Ph.D.

Serves as: chair, co-chair, or member on graduate committee

Research Interests

Current research areas include chemistry of radioactive waste systems, environmental chemistry, actinide separations, and radioanalytical chemistry.

Clowers, Brian, Ph.D.

Serves as: chair, co-chair, or member on graduate committee

Research Interests

The Clowers Research Group combines ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) and mass spectrometry (MS) with optical fragmentation mechanisms to probe complex chemical systems in the gas phase. These hybrid methods address a range of chemical problems spanning from the fundamental to the applied. A few of these research topics include carbohydrate structure determination, intelligent stereochemical ligand development, gas-phase clustering equilibria, and selective ion chemistry for threat detection. In addition to focusing on gas-phase ion behavior, students in my group hone skills related to sample ionization, instrument construction, experimental design and chemometric data analysis. These skills help deliver solutions to a range of chemical problems across domains including national security, environmental analysis, and bioanalytical chemistry.

Collins, Brian, Ph.D.

Serves as: chair, co-chair, or member on graduate committee

Research Interests

Organic Electronics. Optoelectronic properties of organic materials. Resonant X-ray techniques as they relate to solar cells, transistors, batteries, sensors. Nano-mesoscale structures. Film formation and the origins of emergent optoelectronic properties.

Crouch, Gregory, Ph.D.

Serves as: member only on graduate committee

Research Interests

My primary research focus is on chemical education, specifically, how high school science instruction shapes college level chemistry experiences. I am also interested in how experimental science can best be taught in a high school environment with limited lab facilities.

Davydov, Dimitri, Ph.D.

Serves as: member only on graduate committee

Devarie-Baez, Nelmi, Ph.D.

Serves as: chair, co-chair, or member on graduate committee

Feller, David, Ph.D.

Serves as: member only on graduate committee

Research Interests

The development and application of high accuracy electronic structure techniques to the areas of computational thermochemistry and spectroscopy
The creation of a scientific database populated by a wide range of computational and experimental results that permits a detailed assessment of the inherent limitations in each approach
Studies of cation/ligand complexes

Gang, David R, Ph.D.

Serves as: chair, co-chair, or member on graduate committee

Research Interests

Our research seeks to elucidate the biosynthetic pathways that produce novel and important plant specialized metabolites in aromatic plants, to uncover the mechanisms responsible for the evolution of these pathways in the plant kingdom and to understand the function of a given natural product in the biology and physiology of a given plant species.

Garner, Philip P, Ph.D.

Serves as: chair, co-chair, or member on graduate committee

Research Interests

Design and synthesis of biologically active molecules as well as the development of new enabling chemistries.

Heiden, Zachariah, Ph.D.

Serves as: chair, co-chair, or member on graduate committee

Research Interests

Inorganic and organometallic chemistry using spectroscopic techniques to understand reactivity at the molecular level.

Hipps, Kerry, Ph.D.

Serves as: chair, co-chair, or member on graduate committee

Research Interests

The study of surfaces, interfaces, and nanostructures with Scanning Tunneling Microscopy, Scanning Force Microscopy, Tunneling Spectroscopy, X-ray Photoelectron ; UV Photoelectron, Raman, Infrared, and EPR spectroscopy.

Hurst, James, Ph.D.

Serves as: co-chair or member on graduate committee

Research Interests

Retired

Jones, Jeffrey, Ph.D.

Serves as: chair, co-chair, or member on graduate committee

Research Interests

Aldehyde oxidase (AO)
P450 Enzymes
Studying enzyme mechanisms to help with new drug design. Methods include LC-MS/MS, fluorescence, kinetic modeling, molecular biology, synthesis, and molecular modeling.

Jr, Herbert H Hill, Ph.D.

Serves as: chair, co-chair, or member on graduate committee

Research Interests

Retired

Kang, Chulhee, Ph.D.

Serves as: chair, co-chair, or member on graduate committee

Research Interests

SR Calcium Regulation in Cardiac Muscle
Biochemical approaches for cancer-associated proteins and UV-damaged DNA to develop anticancer drugs. Enzyme and Plant engineering for effective generation for biofuel.

Kruse, Norbert, Ph.D.

Serves as: chair, co-chair, or member on graduate committee

Research Interests

Heterogeneous catalysis: from fundamentals to industrial applications.

Lee, David, Ph.D.

Serves as: chair, co-chair, or member on graduate committee

Research Interests

Prof. Lee’s research program at WSU centers around in-situ ultra-high-vacuum Scanning Tunneling Microscopy (STM) in the investigation of chemical changes that occur when material surfaces interact with light and with gas-phase reactants.

Lessmann, Jeremy, Ph.D.

Serves as: member only on graduate committee

Li, Alexander, Ph.D.

Serves as: chair, co-chair, or member on graduate committee

Research Interests

Among the themes of our research are macromolecular design and engineering, advanced materials synthesis, biofunctionality and nanotechnology integration, self-assembly and supramolecular systems, surface chemistry and catalysis, and metal oxide thin films.

One of our research thrusts is to integrate biological functionalities into synthetic nanosystems using molecular self-assembly principles. The goals are to create smart systems that may function as biosensors, nanoactuators, or digital nanocomputers. If we can successfully harvest the knowledge of how biosystems function, perhaps we can apply such smart bio-nano-hybrids back to bioprocesses and test our understanding.

Another thrust aims at constructing nanostructured materials including hollow nanospheres, nanoporous polymers, and self-assembled multilayers. The research interests here range from electronic or photonic materials to controlled absorption and release of organic molecules such as drugs. The target here is to realize our design principles and synthesize new materials having novel and useful chemical, physical, or biological properties. Frequently, skills in organic, inorganic, or polymeric synthesis will be needed to prepare the target nanostructures.

In summary, our philosophy is to use novel methods to construct advanced materials, with an emphasis on molecular design and innovative approaches to demonstrate new concepts, principles, and applications in the chemical, physical, and biological sciences.

Mancini, Rock, Ph.D.

Serves as: chair, co-chair, or member on graduate committee

Research Interests

Molecular control of synthetic targets to effect macroscopic changes in biological and physical systems. Organic chemistry; polymer chemistry; chemical biology.

Matteson, Donald, Ph.D.

Serves as: co-chair or member on graduate committee

Research Interests

Retired
The two great challenges of synthetic organic chemistry at the present time are the control of stereochemistry and the efficient construction of carbon-carbon bonds. We have discovered a method for the efficient connection of carbon atoms with very high asymmetric selectivity which uses a chiral boronic ester group as the template. We have recently obtained diastereoisomer ratios as high as 1000:1. This chemistry is useful for making a wide variety of biologically interesting molecules, including insect pheromones, sugars, amino acids labeled with stable isotopes, antibiotics, and boronic acids that are enzyme inhibitors.

Mazur, Ursula, Ph.D.

Serves as: chair, co-chair, or member on graduate committee

Research Interests

Fabrication and characterization of novel 1, 2, and 3-dimensional assemblies from optoelectronic molecules. Their structure, mechanics, dynamics, and energetics are studied by applying the newest tools and techniques of nanometer-scale science. By correlating structure-function relationship, properties of the supermolecular assemblies are tuned for specific applications (organic electronics, photovoltaics, sensors, molecular recognition, and catalysts).

McCloy, John S, Ph.D.

Serves as: chair, co-chair, or member on graduate committee

Research Interests

Ceramics and metals, degradation mechanisms, effect of disorder on properties, glass composition/structure/property models, functional properties, advanced characterization methods, applications to nuclear waste forms and sensors.

McEwen, Jean-Sabin, Ph.D.

Serves as: chair, co-chair, or member on graduate committee

Research Interests

Atomistic modeling of catalytic processes for energy applications within the Gene and Linda Voiland School of Chemical Engineering and Bioengineering.

McHale, Jeanne, Ph.D.

Serves as: co-chair or member on graduate committee

Research Interests

Retired

Nash, Ken, Ph.D.

Serves as: chair, co-chair, or member on graduate committee

Research Interests

Retiring spring 2018

Peterson, Kirk, Ph.D.

Serves as: chair, co-chair, or member on graduate committee

Research Interests

Accurate ab initio quantum chemistry applied to the thermodynamic and spectroscopic properties of small molecules, particularly those involving heavy elements; development of Gaussian basis sets for molecular quantum chemistry.

Reilly, Peter, Ph.D.

Serves as: chair, co-chair, or member on graduate committee

Research Interests

Characterization of aerosols and biomolecules by mass spectrometry and the development of digital waveform technology and methods to extend the working range of mass spectrometry out beyond the million Dalton range so that intact proteins, protein complexes and even whole viruses can be mass analyzed as singly charged ions.

Ronald, Robert, PhD

Serves as: chair, co-chair, or member on graduate committee

Research Interests

Retiring spring 2018

Scudiero, Louis, Ph.D.

Serves as: member only on graduate committee

Wall, Donald, Ph.D.

Serves as: member only on graduate committee

Research Interests

Director of Nuclear Radiation Center

Wall, Nathalie, Ph.D.

Serves as: chair, co-chair, or member on graduate committee

Research Interests

Environmental behavior of radionuclides (actinides, lanthanides, and fission products): applications for nuclear waste managements, site remediations, and nuclear forensics.

Wherland, Scot, Ph.D.

Serves as: co-chair or member on graduate committee

Research Interests

Retired

Xian, Ming, Ph.D.

Serves as: chair, co-chair, or member on graduate committee

Research Interests

Combining organic synthesis with bioorganic chemistry to examine, understand, and solve problems of biological and medicinal significance; synthetic methodology development; natural product synthesis; bioorthogonal reactions for protein identification; development of bio-based new materials.

Yoo, Choong-Shik, Ph.D.

Serves as: chair, co-chair, or member on graduate committee

Research Interests

Extreme materials research at the pressure-temperature conditions of the Earth’s and Jovian planetary interiors; Discovery and characterization of new and novel materials formed under high pressure.

Zhang, Jinwen, Ph.D.

Serves as: chair, co-chair, or member on graduate committee

Research Interests

Synthesizing and exploring new polymer materials from renewable feedstock, toughening, reinforcing and application development of biobased polymer materials.

Zhang, Qiang, Ph.D.

Serves as: chair, co-chair, or member on graduate committee

Research Interests

The research in Zhang group will mainly focus on the integration of porous materials, primarily metal–organic frameworks (MOFs), with molecular compounds, metal cluster complexes, and nano‐materials or polymers. The goal of our research is to use these novel and multi‐functional hybrid materials in biomimetic catalysis, photocatalysis, hydrogen production, sensing, and gas separation. Students who are interested in inorganic chemistry, porous materials, or catalysis/photocatalysis are strongly encouraged to join. Students in Zhang group will be well trained in inorganic and organic synthesis, techniques for handling air-sensitive compounds, column and thin layer chromatography, powder X-ray diffraction analysis, single-crystal X-ray crystallography, thermogravimetric analysis, spectroscopy (UV-vis, FTIR, Fluorescence, NMR), and modern research related software (Office, Chemdraw, Mercury, Olex2, etc.).

Contact Information:

Stacie Olsen-Wilkes
Washington State University
PO BOX 644630
Pullman, WA 99164-4630
509-335-0946
509-335-8867