Skip to main content Skip to navigation
Washington State University Archives

Phyllis Eide Receives Mentor Academy Award for Excellence

By Cheryl Reed

The WSU Graduate School has awarded Associate Professor Phyllis Eide the 2017 Graduate School Mentor Academy Award for Excellence for her work in mentoring graduate students. Eide has been a faculty member in the College of Nursing on the WSU Spokane campus since 2002, and a member of the Graduate School Mentor Academy since 2009.

“When I found out I had won the award, I just about fell off my chair,” said Eide. “I am gratified beyond belief. It is one of the highlights of my year.”

The Graduate Mentor Academy is a group of faculty who have volunteered to assist students during the most challenging aspects of their program, including preliminary examinations and defenses. The Graduate School established the Graduate Mentor Academy to provide students an unbiased and supportive presence during exams and defenses—someone to ensure that university policies and procedures are followed and correct protocol is observed. For example, Mentor Academy faculty will collect ballots, make sure that no committee member leaves during a defense, and assist in creating a comfortable test environment for the student.

“Logistically, taking exams and defending can be very difficult for students,” says Bill Andrefsky, dean of the Graduate School. “People in the Graduate School programs department rely on faculty mentors to step up and serve students as advocates, either upon the student’s request, or for a student’s second exam attempt. Dr. Eide is one faculty who has always willingly served graduate students over the years—which is why I established this award last year. Faculty need to be recognized for their service.”

Faculty members volunteer for the Graduate Mentor Academy upon invitation from the Graduate School, and serve for a three-year term—although their term is often renewed.

“Dr. Eide mentored nine different students on two different test retakes this year,” says Mary Stormo, academic coordinator in the Graduate School. “She also met with committees and assisted in negotiating the swirling waters around students who were taking their exams for the second time. She helped work out the exam kinks with the department to ensure that fair testing was in place.”

Eide says that her presence at exams and defenses usually has a calming effect on the student, but that is not her only purpose. She also takes care of other more concrete tasks of the exam and defense process to make sure the process is comfortable and as stress-free as possible.

“I always arrive early to coordinate with the chair,” she says. “At the last event, I contacted the IT Department to make sure that all the technology was working correctly to prepare for electronic testing.”

In spite of the time commitment, Eide says that serving the students has been an honor.

Eide is an associate professor in the WSU College of Nursing in Spokane. She has been certified by American Nurses’ Credentialing Center in advanced practice nursing as a clinical nurse specialist in community health since 1992 and holds a certificate in Decision Making for Climate Change from the University of Washington (2010). Before entering academia in 1992 at University of Hawaii/Hilo, she worked in a wide variety of community settings, including positions in public health, migrant school nurse, Associate Director of Hawaii Nurses’ Association, and vocational rehabilitation. Her primary practice and research interests are rural health, global climate change, and public health.

“It takes a village for this kind of work,” says Eide, who plans to use the Graduate Mentor Academy award to fund her new research on climate change.

Eide will receive her award at the Graduate School Evening of Excellence event on April 13. This is the second year that the Graduate School has awarded the Graduate School Mentor Academy Award for Excellence. In 2016, Lisa McIntyre of the Department of Sociology won the first annual award.

For more information about the Graduate School’s mentor policy and the role of Graduate Mentor Academy members, visit HERE.

Graduate School


Educational psychology doctoral
student awarded prestigious
internship

Learn More

 

A Bear in Your Sight is Worth Two in the Bush
Learn More

Doctoral Student Researches Language and Technology to Help Others

Learn More

Horticulturist Explores Genetics of Resistance to Fire Blight in Apples

Learn More

 

 

 

Doctoral Candidate Researches Persuasive Power of Communication Technologies

Learn More

Graduate Student Andrew Raub Earns BAEF Fellowship

Learn More

Grad Student in Civil Engineering Detects Damage Inside Concrete

Learn More

Pharm D candidate selected as ASPET Washington Fellow

 

Learn more

 

 

 

Grad student’s research replacing cement with fly ash greatly improves concrete

 

Learn More

 

 

 

MFA Student’s Art Reveals Deeper Truths Through Humor 

 

Learn More

 

IMPORTANT!!  WSU has enabled MFA for myWSU.

  • If you have not already set up MFA, please visit your self-service account settings at account.wsu.edu and look for the Extra Verification section.
  • It is highly recommended to configure at least two factors to allow for access in the case of losing one. More information can be found at its.wsu.edu/mfa

In the News


  • A Bear in Your Sight is Worth Two in the Bush

    By Carla De Lira and Cynthia Hollenbeck

    If you’ve ever hiked in the wilderness and seen a large object nearby, you may have asked yourself, “Was that a bear or a bush?” To master’s student in natural resource sciences at Washington State University, Cullen Anderson, the question is an important component of his research. Cullen studies how the black bear population data from North Cascades National Park in Washington state can provide important information for park management decision making. Cullen Anderson with Bear Decoy at North Cascades National ParkCullen Anderson carrying one of his bear decoys for his
    » More …

    Read Story
  • Doctoral Student Researches Language and Technology to Help Others

    By Elle Ciaciuch O’Neill and Cynthia Hollenbeck

    Jose Riera, Ph.D. candidate in Washington State University’s College of Education, focuses his research on developing computer applications to help foreign language learners, immigrants, and individuals with communicative disabilities to improve their pronunciation skills. According to Jose, there are 1 billion foreign language learners, 275 million immigrants, and 550 million individuals with communicative disabilities worldwide. With these numbers, Jose hopes this research will make a notable impact on the language-learning world.

    One of the main challenges for second language learners is understanding and articulating unfamiliar new sounds in their target language. Jose believes that by providing these learners … » More …

    Read Story
  • Horticulturist Explores Genetics of Resistance to Fire Blight in Apples

    By Cynthia Hollenbeck and Elle Ciaciuch O’Neill

    Sarah Kostick, Ph.D., is making great strides in the world of apple breeding at Washington State University. By investigating resistance/susceptibility to fire blight in apples to enable more efficient development of apple varieties with resistance to fire blight, she has found that specific genomic regions (also called genetic loci) are associated with resistance, and much more.

    Fire blight is a devastating bacterial disease that affects a range of apple cultivars (varieties). This disease has the potential to cause tree death and, depending on the year, can destroy entire orchards. Fire blight, caused by the bacterium Erwinia amylovora, can infect … » More …

    Read Story

Read More News

Upcoming Events


Read More


WSU Graduate School has more than 140 Graduate Programs + Certificates

6 Campuses, including online

39 Extension Offices

4 Research and Extension Centers